The Kid from Diamond Street: The Extraordinary Story of Baseball Legend Edith Houghton

When Edith Houghton was born, in 1912, girls didn’t play baseball. But Edith grew up watching her big brothers and neighbors play ball in the park across the street, and she joined them whenever she could. They didn’t mind, because she was good. So good that when she was just ten years old, she tried out for a professional baseball team, the Philadelphia Bobbies, and was named starting shortstop. She was the smallest on the field, but soon reporters were talking about “The Kid” and her incredible talent. Her skill and lifelong love of the game led her halfway around the world. Her journey made it clear that baseball is everyone’s sport—boys and girls, young and old—and that hard work and passion can open doors that seem forever closed, even for a kid.  

Reading about Edith’s life is immensely fun not only because she’s inspirational, but also because her life was full of adventure. Edith wasn’t content watching others play baseball. Instead, she was out in the field, playing with the boys, which eventually gave her the skills to try out for the Bobbies.   

The Kid from Diamond Street brings Edith’s story to life and includes quotes that help bring Edith’s personality to life. The book uses chockablock illustrations that take readers back to the 1920s. Young readers will enjoy studying the lively illustrations, which are full of historical details. They include baseball scenes as well as scenes of the Bobbies sailing on a ship, playing a prank, and eating with chopsticks. The book ends with additional historical information, plus sepia pictures of Edith.   

Even though The Kid from Diamond Street is a picture book, it is intended to be read aloud to young readers. Each page has four to six complex sentences that include difficult vocabulary. Because of the text-heavy pages, squirmy young readers may have a difficult time sitting through the entire story.  

Readers young and old will appreciate learning about Edith’s contribution to baseball history. Edith’s love of baseball shines through on every page and her baseball career highlights the importance of living your dream. Readers who want to learn more about women’s contributions to baseball should also read  Players in Pigtails by Shana Corey and Catching the Moon by Crystal Hubbard. To add some fictional fun to young readers’ lists, check out Ellie Steps Up to the Plate by Callie Barkley and Baseball Ballerina by Kathryn Cristaldi. 

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Muncha! Muncha! Muncha!

Tippy, tippy, tippy, Pat! That’s the sound three hungry bunnies make when the sun goes down and the moon comes up and Mr. McGreely’s garden smells yum, yum, yummy. While he’s dreaming of his mouth-watering carrots, the bunnies are diving over fences and swimming in trenches to get the veggies first!  

Hammer, hammer, hammer, Saw! That’s the sound Mr. McGreely makes when the sun comes up and the moon goes down and he sees what those twitch-whiskers have done. . . Nibbled leaves! Empty stalks! Mr. McGreely will build something bigger and better, sure to keep even pesky puff-tails away.  

If you’re looking for a fabulously funny book, hop to the library and check out a copy of Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! Young readers will cheer for the bunnies as they find different ways to outsmart Mr. McGreely, who just wants to enjoy his vegetable garden. Each time the bunnies sneak into the garden, Mr. McGreely comes up with a bigger, and funnier way to keep the bunnies out. In the end, Mr. McGreely gives up and is seen munching a carrot along with the bunnies. 

In order to fully enjoy the story, readers will want to find the bunnies but this will require them to pay close attention to each page’s illustrations. Almost every page shows the bunnies who are often spying on Mr. McGreely. Even though Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! is a picture book, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. While some of the pages are text heavy with up to six complex sentences, both adults and children will love all of the elements that make the book perfect for reading aloud. Some words are in large text and should be read with emphasis. Fleming also uses sound effects, repetition, rhyming, and funny word choices such as “jiggly, wiggly.” In addition, Mr. McGreely’s creative names for the bunnies such as “twitch-whiskers” will leave readers giggling. 

Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! is a classic picture book that children will want to read again and again. If you’re looking for a book that will make readers smile, Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! is the perfect book for you. If you’re hungry for more good books, add Too Many Carrots by Katy Hudson and Snail Crossing by Corey R. Tabor to your reading list. 

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The Vast Wonder of the World: Biologist Ernest Everett Just

Ernest Everett Just was not like other scientists of his time. He saw the whole, where others saw only parts. He noticed details others failed to see. He persisted in his research despite the discrimination and limitations imposed on him as an African American. His keen observations of sea creatures revealed new insights about egg cells and the origins of life. 

Any child who loves nature will be delighted by The Vast Wonder of the World. Despite many difficulties in life—such as contracting typhoid, losing his mother at a young age, and having to work while going to college—Ernest never gave up on his dreams. He knew “he had to keep going.” Once in college, “Ernest took a biology class and his life changed forever. In that class, he discovered the microscopic world of the cell.”  

The Vast Wonder of the World book explains how Ernest used his knowledge to research and experiment. Several pages illustrate and explain what Ernest learned about cells. While not all readers will understand the importance of Ernest’s discoveries, they will understand how Ernest’s perseverance led him to become an independent researcher.  

Ernest’s world is illustrated with beautiful illustrations that showcase Ernest’s love of nature. Readers will enjoy seeing underneath the microscope, where they get a close-up look at marine worms. Many pictures also show Ernest exploring outside where fish swim, pelicans float, and starfish rest on the bottom of the ocean. The beautiful illustrations use natural tones such as light blues, greens, and browns. Even though The Vast Wonder of the World is a picture book, it is more suited to older readers because of the text-heavy pages, advanced vocabulary, and complex sentence structure. Reading about Ernest’s life and accomplishments will inspire readers. 

The book ends with a page of notable quotes by Ernest, a section titled “Author’s Notes” that explains more about Ernest’s life and the time period, as well as a timeline of Ernest’s life. Ernest believed people should “live with the true, and when you are ready to embark on life’s unknown waters, place yourself at the helm confident of but one destination—success.” While The Vast Wonder of the World will primarily appeal to readers who already love exploring nature, Ernest’s story also shows the importance of overcoming obstacles to achieve your dreams. Because of Ernest’s extraordinary life, his story should be shared with readers of all ages.  

To learn more about extraordinary people who love the ocean, swim over to the library and check out Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating and Manfish: A Story of Jacques Cousteau by Jennifer Berne. 

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  • Several pages make a brief statement about discrimination. For example, while teaching in the United States, “The time came when Ernest refused to tolerate the segregation any longer. He decided to move to France and become an independent researcher.” 

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Hank Aaron: Brave in Every Way

On April 8, 1974, America watched as Hank Aaron stepped up to the plate and hit home run number 715! With that hit, he surpassed Babe Ruth’s legendary baseball record and realized a lifelong dream. This is the story of how Hank Aaron became a great ballplayer and an inspiration to us all. 

When Hank was born, his mother wanted him to “make a difference in the world.” Meanwhile, his father wanted him to “know the joy of playing baseball in open grassy fields.” While no one knew it at the time, Hank would fulfill both of his parents’ expectations. Hank Aaron: Brave in Every Way begins with Hank’s early childhood. The story describes how Hank’s family was poor, but there was still plenty of love and an open field for playing baseball. When Hank was in school, he was inspired by Jackie Robinson. Like Jackie Robinson, Hank faced discrimination because of the color of his skin.  

Before blacks were allowed in the major leagues, Hank was determined to play. When Hank received hate mail, he “decided to fight the best way he could. He swore that each angry letter would add a home run to his record.” The closer Hank got to beating Babe Ruth’s record, the more fans cheered for him and Hank received “almost a million letters to offer him support.” In the end, despite facing many obstacles, Hank did something remarkable—he beat Babe Ruth’s home run record.   

Even though Hank Aaron: Brave in Every Way is a picture book, the story will need to be read aloud to a child, rather than for a child to read it independently. Many of the pages are text-heavy with five to thirteen complex sentences. Each two-page spread has one page for the text and one full-page illustration. The realistic illustrations use browns and other primary colors that mostly feature Hank at baseball games. 

Hank Aaron: Brave in Every Way is a motivational biography that focuses on Hank’s ability to overcome obstacles. Hank’s remarkable talent and resilience will motivate young readers to reach for their dreams. Since Hank’s story includes examples of discrimination, young readers may need help understanding why people hated Hank because he was black. Readers who want to learn more about Hank Aaron should also read Baseball’s Best: Five True Stories by Andrew Gutelle. For more motivational non-fiction baseball books, readers should also read Catching the Moon: The Story of a Young Girl’s Baseball Dream by Crystal Hubbard and Baseball Saved Us by Ken Mochizuki. 

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  • When Hank Aaron started to play on the Braves’ team, “some people resented Hank’s success because of the color of his skin. He began to get one or two unsigned letters each week filled with insults and nasty names.” 
  • One illustration shows letters in the background. The letters are all negative and one reads “Retire or die!” Another letter says, “Quit or youe [sic] dead.” 

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  • Hank beat Babe Ruth’s home run record. “That night, when he was alone at last, Hank got down on his knees, closed his eyes, and thanked God for pulling him through.”  

Little Black Boy: Oh, the Things You Will Do!

Fascinated by marine wildlife, a little Black boy dreams of one day swimming in the ocean alongside all the creatures that make it their home. It will take courage to move from the safety of the swimming pool to the vastness of the ocean, but as he begins his journey of discovery, he soon finds there’s nothing he can’t do. He realizes if he cares about the animals in the ocean, he must also care about their home and sets out to preserve the beaches he loves by picking up trash. This little boy is determined not only to reach his dream of becoming a marine biologist but also to make a difference in the world and to share his passion for environmental conservation with everyone. 

The beautiful illustrations will captivate readers as they go on a journey with the little Black boy. Along the way, the text imparts pearls of wisdom such as, “It’s okay If you laugh; it’s okay if you cry. It’s okay if you miss; what counts is you try.” The story also encourages the reader to “savor your youth” and “speak your mind freely.” Since the book has so many important life lessons, adults will want to read the book with their children again and again.  

Even though Little Black Boy is a picture book, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. Each page has two to four sentences. However, the text does not always align with illustrations. For example, when the boy and his friends are cleaning trash from the beach, two boys stare at them. The text reads, “‘Toughen up,’ you may hear, or ‘Act like a man,’ things you’ll be told that you won’t understand.” Despite this, the motivational tone of the story will encourage readers to “know your own heart.”  

Little Black Boy begins by addressing the little Black boy in the illustrations. However, the book’s message applies to all readers. The book will inspire readers to “educate yourself” and to be a role model to others. Since the book gives a lot of advice, Little Black Boy should be read to older children. The book’s message of self-affirmation makes it a must-read book for anyone who looks to the future and wonders about all the things that they will do. 

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The Lost Kitten

Katie Fry may be little, but she’s got a big brain, and she uses it to solve mysteries. So when she finds a very cute, VERY lost kitten named Sherlock, she decides to take his case. Can Katie track down the clues to find Sherlock’s home? Beginning readers will love hunting for clues in the art right along with Katie and Sherlock! 

Katie Fry is a curious protagonist that readers will love. She uses her powers of observation to help the cat, Sherlock, find his home. For example, when Katie first finds Sherlock, she notices that Sherlock has “trimmed nails, coat is brushed and cared for,” and the “fur around his neck is pushed down.” From this Katie deduces that “you once had a home and a collar.” When Katie runs out of clues, a yellow bird suddenly appears and reveals what he knows about Sherlock’s past. In the end, Katie finds Sherlock’s home, but that’s not the end of their friendship. The last page shows Katie and Sherlock, ready to solve another mystery. 

The Lost Kitten is part of Scholastic’s Level 2 Reader, which is perfect for developing readers, who are ready to learn new vocabulary words. Each page has one to three sentences. While most of the vocabulary is basic, readers may need help with more advanced words such as adventures, Sherlock, and evidence. Much like a picture book, every page has a brightly colored, large illustration. The illustrations will help readers understand the plot as well as give readers a chance to look for clues. 

The Katie Fry, Private Eye Series will appeal to a wide range of readers including those who love animals, mysteries, and a compassionate protagonist. The simple plot engages readers who will try to solve the mystery alongside Katie. For more reading fun, check out the following books: Shampoodle by Joan Holub, Otters Love to Play by Jonathan London, and The Firefly with No Glow by Rebecca Smallberg.  

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To Boldly Go: How Nichelle Nichols and Star Trek Helped Advance Civil Rights

As Lieutenant Uhura on the iconic prime-time television show Star Trek, Nichelle Nichols played the first Black female astronaut anyone had ever seen on screen. A smart, strong, independent Black woman aboard the starship Enterprise was revolutionary in the 1960s when only white men had traveled to outer space in real life and most Black characters on TV were servants. 

To Boldly Go will inspire readers to learn more about many Black people of importance. Nichelle not only inspired a generation to pursue their dreams, but also opened the door for the real-life, pioneering astronauts Sally Ride, Dr. Mae Jemison, and more. 

This empowering tribute to the trailblazing pop culture icon reminds us of the importance of perseverance and the power of representation in storytelling. You just might be inspired to boldly go where no one like you has ever gone before! 

Before her iconic role as Lieutenant Uhura, Nichelle Nichols knew she wanted to be a performer and she spent time learning ballet and singing for legendary bandleader Duke Ellington. Despite her talent and her role in Star Trek, Nichelle’s confidence took a beating and “Nichelle no longer felt strong and confident.” However, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. helped Nichelle understand the importance of Lieutenant Uhura’s role. Dr. King said, “You have opened a door that must not be allowed to close…Don’t you see that you’re not just a role model for Black children? You’re important for people who don’t look like us. For the first time, the world sees us as we should be seen, as equals, as intelligent people.”  

When Nichelle became discouraged about her limited role in Star Trek, she reminded herself “what her presence meant to the lives of the people who looked like her.” Because of Nichelle’s starring role, other Black people were encouraged to reach for their dreams. However, Nichelle’s influence didn’t stop on the screen. Her role also allowed others to dream about traveling in space and eventually helped recruit potential astronauts for NASA. To Boldly Go will encourage children to learn about other amazing astronauts, which they can do by reading Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13 by Helaine Becker, Apollo 13 by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld, and Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer by Traci Sorell. 

Nichelle’s story comes to life with illustrations that use bold colors. Each page includes one to six sentences. However, because of the complexity of the sentences and the advanced vocabulary, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. To Boldly Go includes instances of racism but doesn’t describe the violence in detail, and there are no violent illustrations. Despite the hardships that Nichelle faced, To Boldly Go uses a positive and upbeat tone that will leave children feeling inspired.  

To Boldly Go is an encouraging and engaging picture book that is perfect to add to anyone’s personal library. The book will have wide appeal because of Nichelle’s role in Star Trek. Nichelle’s experiences will encourage children to follow their dreams and show them the importance of perseverance.  

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  • The narrator watches the news and sees “real-life suffering the marchers endured because of racism. Attack dogs. Fire hoses. Jail. People watched as this happened to both children and adults, just because of the color of their skin.” 

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Sugar and Spice and Everything Mice

Like most mice, Mona, Millie, and Marcella saw winter as a time to burrow deep underground away from the cold outdoors. To their friend Lucy, winter is the best season of the year — a season that gives the most reasons for going outside. Winter means snowball fights, snow angels, and her favorite pastime, ice skating.  

Lucy’s love for winter used to confuse Mona, Millie, and Marcella, but once she showed them how to ice skate, they quickly embraced winter. So goes the story of Mice Skating, a short and delightful picture book by Annie Silvestro. Its sequel, Sugar and Spice and Everything Mice, shows the four mice out in the snow, bundled in winter clothes, and gliding across a frozen pond together on their ice skates. Since the last book, the mice have become better skaters, and winter has become each mouse’s favorite time of the year. However, their fun is interrupted when a harsh storm forces the mice to stay underground for the day.  

As Lucy prepares hot chocolate for her friends, she has an idea — this is a perfect opportunity to show her friends how grateful she is that they embraced winter. To give her friends something truly special means Lucy will have to teach herself a new skill — baking. But this skill is more difficult than she expects.  

Sugar and Spice and Everything Mice is a warm and pleasant picture book that perfectly plays off the message of its predecessor. Whereas Mice Skating shows that moments spent alone can help you discover some of your favorite interests, Sugar and Spice and Everything Mice teaches readers that it’s okay to struggle with new activities and it’s smart to ask for help from friends. As Lucy tries and fails to bake a perfect meal for her friends, she repeatedly refuses their offers to help because she’s afraid of being seen as a failure. By the end of the story, she learns that everyone needs help sometimes, and learning to receive it is just as important as knowing how to offer it.  

The book is a brief and easy read for younger readers, with about three to seven short sentences per page. While the writing itself is approachable for younger readers, Christee Curran-Bauer manages to perfectly convey the book’s story through her illustrations. Drawing simple characters and dressing them in several unique outfits to fit each moment of the story. For example, she draws beanies and scarves when they’re skating, blankets when they’re inside, and aprons when they’re baking. The mice are placed in carefully colored backgrounds. The walls of the burrow are covered in pleasant shades of brown, orange, and yellow, while the frozen pond outside is painted black to contrast with the snowy environment. Curran-Bauer visually translates the cozy, fuzzy feeling of Silvestro’s story. 

If you enjoyed Mice Skating, you are sure to find the second adventure of Lucy and her friends just as charming. If this is the first book you will read about the four mice, it is sure to give you the same warm, blissful feeling. If you’re looking for more winter-themed books to snuggle up and read, A Loud Winter’s Nap by Katy Hudson and Fox Versus Winter by Corey R. Tabor are great options.

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Rocket Says Speak Up!

When Rocket finds out that her town’s library is closing, she knows something must be done. Inspired by the activism of Rosa Parks, Rocket rallies support from her peers, and together they lead a peaceful protest that spreads awareness and raises enough money to save their beloved library. 

The story begins with Rocket explaining why she loves the library. She also talks about reading a book about Rosa Parks and gives a brief description of Rosa’s famous protest. Because of Rosa, Rocket decides to help the library by having a peaceful protest. However, Rocket doesn’t act alone. Instead, she gathers students, teachers, parents, and the librarian to all “get prepared and spread the word.”

After the protest, Rocket feels discouraged and wonders “What was the point?” But then the mayor shows up and explains that “people around the world were inspired by our protest, and lots of them have given money to save the library.” While the positive outcome of the protest may feel unrealistic, young readers will learn that their voice matters. 

Even though Rocket Says Speak Up! is a picture book, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for a child to read it for the first time independently. Most pages contain one to four sentences, and some of the sentences are complex. The picture book’s bright illustrations are full of fun details. Readers will enjoy looking for Rocket’s cat, who appears on many of the pages. Another positive aspect is that scenes of the library and school show a diverse group of children, including one who is in a wheelchair. 

Rocket Says Speak Up! shows the importance of libraries and encourages readers to spend time at their local library. The book also includes many interesting facts about libraries and encourages children to check out different types of books. To further foster a love of learning at the library, Bunny’s Book Club by Annie Silvestro is the perfect book to read after Rocket Says Speak Up! 

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The Miracle of the First Poinsettia

It is la Noche Buena, Christmas Eve, and soon festivities will be taking place in the mountain village that is Juanita’s home. But as she wanders through the colorful marketplace, Juanita feels lonely and sad. This year, her father is out of work, and their family has no pesos for parties or gifts. How can she enter the church for midnight mass with nothing—not even the tiniest present—to give to the baby Christ Child?

As her family prepares for the holiday, Juanita is embarrassed that she doesn’t have a gift to present to the baby Christ Child. However, when an angel statue speaks to Juanita, the young girl trusts the angel and plucks the weeds from around the statue. At first, Juanita was “frightened and confused. She wondered how she could bring such plain weeds to the Baby Jesus.” However, Juanita follows the angel’s instructions and takes the weeds into the church. As Juanita walks down the aisle, the weeds miraculously turn into poinsettia flowers, which today grow in abundance in Mexico.

The Miracle of the First Poinsettia explains the story behind the first Poinsettia. Each illustration uses the dark red tone of the flower to bring traditional Old-World Mexico to life. Even though the illustrations are enchanting, young readers will have a difficult time sitting still through the entire story. Because of the text-heavy pages, which have up to 15 complex sentences, parents will need to read the book to their children. To highlight Mexican culture, Spanish words are used within the text. Each Spanish word appears in italics and a glossary appears at the back of the book to aid non-Spanish speakers. 

The Miracle of the First Poinsettia is a beautiful story about the wonder of Christmas. At first, Juanita focuses on the gift-giving traditions. Even though Juanita does not have a gift to give, her mother reminds her, “Ah, mi hija, you give gifts all the time. You gave your galletas to your brothers. You sang songs for Papá. You bring such joy. To us, you are a gift!” Through her difficulties, Juanita learns that “a gift from the heart is the best gift of all.”

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  • The story focuses on the Christmas season and the miracle of the first poinsettia.

Mice Skating

Like most mice, Mona, Millie, and Marcella are no fans of winter. During these cold months, they dig a burrow for themselves deep underground to keep warm until spring. Their friend Lucy is not like most mice. Winter is her favorite time of year. She spends these days outside, making snow angels, snow mice, and catching snowflakes with her tongue. When she returns to the burrow with dripping fur and snow-covered paws, her friends are none too pleased.  

Mona, Millie, and Marcella do not understand the appeal of winter, but this hasn’t stopped Lucy from trying to sway them. She has made snow cones for her friends and gifted them giant icicles from outside. Once, she even brought in heaps of snow for an indoor snowball fight. Hard as Lucy tries, each attempt always ends the same. Her friends stay averse to winter, and Lucy continues to play outside alone.  

One day, after slipping on a patch of ice, Lucy discovers a new activity – ice skating! Crafting a pair of ice skates from pine needles, Lucy commits to the new hobby. No matter how many times she slips or loses balance, she is determined to keep trying until she gets it right. It doesn’t take long for Mona, Millie, and Marcella to notice that Lucy is spending less time pestering them and more time by herself outside. Has Lucy finally given up on convincing them? Or has she found a winter activity that all her friends can enjoy? 

Mice Skating is a fun and cheerful picture book that will show young readers the many ways that they can enjoy winter. The story also shows spending time alone and spending time with friends can be equally rewarding. With one to seven short sentences per page, Mice Skating is an easy read. Teagan White’s illustrations give the book a distinct warmth, placing modern, streamlined characters in desaturated vignette drawings to give the book a nostalgic and timeless feel. These illustrations will be particularly fun for the many detail-oriented readers, who will enjoy the many background gags that White hides in every other page (among these gags, you will find that cases of cheese are hung about the burrow as decorations, while bits of litter serve as the mice’s furniture and kitchen supplies). 

If you are looking for a funny and clever story to entertain young readers this winter season, Mice Skating is the book for you. If you enjoy this book, make sure to check out its sequel, Sugar and Spice and Everything Mice, where a snowstorm forces Lucy to adapt to life indoors. For more ice-skating fun, check out Tallulah’s Ice Skates by Marilyn Singer. 

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The Christmas Tree Who Loved Trains

In a far-off corner of a tree farm, beside a train track, sits a solitary pine. There are no other trees to keep this pine tree company. The noisy rumbling of each passing train scares squirrels from climbing onto the tree’s branches and birds from nesting there. But this tree doesn’t mind.  

Having grown up beside the train track, the pine tree loves the trains. They are the only company she needs. One morning, a little boy visits the farm looking for a Christmas tree. To the pine’s surprise, the boy picks her. Before the pine tree knows it, she is dug out from the ground and taken to the boy’s house, where she is placed in a dark and cramped corner of the living room. Will being separated from the trains be too much for the tree? Or will she find something new with the boy and his family? 

The Christmas Tree Who Loved Trains is a charming and heartfelt story for readers who celebrate the holiday, as well as for anyone who has to adjust to a big change in their life. With one to eight short sentences per page, younger readers should have little trouble enjoying the book.  

Annie Silvestro’s writing manages the near-impossible task of getting readers to empathize with a faceless pine tree. Illustrator Paola Zakimi gives readers a closer understanding of the tree with drawings that visualize the tree’s feelings towards the events of the story. For example, each train emerges from a majestic, mysterious fog. The train and track are drawn with meticulous detail, while the field of trees behind the pine tree fades into a smaller, muted background. Meanwhile, the living room corner is drawn as dark and dull, with faded colors and shadowy backgrounds. As the tree warms up to the family and their house, the drawings of the room become increasingly brighter and colorful.  

In The Christmas Tree Who Loved Trains, readers of all ages will find a sweet and sincere story about adjusting to change and embracing your unique traits and interests. Readers who celebrate Christmas are sure to relate to the tree’s growing admiration for the holiday, and all readers are likely to find comfort in the tree’s story. If you are looking for a warm read this winter, The Christmas Tree Who Loved Trains may be the book for you. 

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  • Although the book is a celebration of Christmas, it does not define the holiday as a strictly spiritual one. Instead, Christmas is portrayed as a day for being together with the ones you love. 

How Do Dinosaurs Say Happy Chanukah?

Even during the holidays, little dinosaurs sometimes misbehave. It’s tempting to peek at brightly wrapped presents, snatch a dreidel, or grab all the gelt!  

Children and their parents will laugh at this playful glimpse at some mischievous antics as the family gathers and fresh latkes are served. But when mama comes in with the holiday lights, it’s time to share a special tradition. How do dinosaurs celebrate Chanukah? With an abundance of love, joy, memories, and gratitude. 

Children will fall in love with each mischievous dinosaur that appears in brightly colored full-page illustrations. Each two-page spread has one sentence printed in large font. Plus, the short rhyming lines add to the playful nature of the picture book. 

The first half of the book focuses on the dinosaurs’ naughty behavior by asking a question: “Does he peek at the presents stashed under Dad’s bed?” The dinosaurs’ naughty behavior includes one dinosaur who is sneaking off with the gelt and “squeezing the candy coins till they all melt.” Readers will giggle at the family’s funny facial expressions, which show their dismay. 

The second part of the book uses the same brightly colored illustrations to show how the dinosaurs actually act during the holiday. Instead of misbehaving, a dinosaur sings “the holiday prayer, takes turns with the dreidel, remembers to share,” and other good behavior. Throughout the book, the menorah often shines in the window. While the story highlights the holiday traditions, readers unfamiliar with the holiday will not understand some of the terms such as dreidel, latkes, and gelt. 

How Do Dinosaurs Say Happy Chanukah? uses silly dinosaurs to show the importance of acting properly during the eight days of Chanukah. While the story doesn’t explain the meaning behind the traditions, readers familiar with the holiday will enjoy the unique perspective that shows the joy of the Chanukah season. Hoppy Hanukkah! by Linda Glaser is another fun picture book that introduces readers to Jewish customs.

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language   

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

  • The book highlights the traditions of Chanukah.

Otters Love to Play

On the edge of a river sits a neat pile of sticks, leaves, and grass. Last year, this was a beaver lodge, but now, in spring, it has become the home of a new family of otters! Inside this otter den, a mother otter feeds her three newborn pups (the pups’ father, readers will learn, is chased away by the mother after the pups are born). Readers will follow the mother otter as she shows the pups how to swim, hunt for fish, and perhaps the most important lesson for an otter pup – how to play!  

Written by the author of Froggy and nature-lover Jonathan London, Otters Love to Play is a quick and straightforward book that educates readers on the early lives of otters. While readers may already know that otters live in dens and hunt for fish, they may be surprised to learn that the species’ powerful tails and waterproof fur allow them to swim faster than Olympic swimmers! Each page features the otters learning something new – from walking to swimming. With each new thing the pups learn, the reader also learns a fact about the otters which are at the bottom of every other page. For example, while the story shows how fiercely protective otter mothers are of their pups, a note at the bottom of the page explains how adult otters can run up to eighteen miles an hour on snow, making them intimidating forces to predators.  

Otters Love to Play is brought to life by the illustrations of Meilo So. Throughout the book, readers witness the pups as they experience each season for the first time. So’s beautiful mix of colors gives life and variety to each season. Pages set in spring are painted with beautiful swabs of pink and purple skies, filling the reader with the same wonder felt by the pups, while pages set in winter are made with harsh whites and grays, sharing the idea of brutal climates and perilous conditions endangering the pups. All these illustrations are brightened by So’s adorable drawings of the otters, which are sure to delight readers of all ages. 

Even though Otters Love to Play is intended for younger readers, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. As part of the Read and Wonder Series, Otters Love to Play introduces readers to natural history and fascinating facts that show how wonderful the natural world is. If you are looking for a book that educates young readers on a fascinating species while also providing plenty of fun and cute moments, Otters Love to Play is an excellent choice. Readers who love the ocean should jump in and read Way Down Deep in the Deep Blue Sea by Jan Peck. 

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural 

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Spiritual Content 

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Tallulah’s Toe Shoes

Tallulah is back in ballet class and now she wants to go en pointe—to dance up on the tips of her toes in pink satin toe shoes, like a real ballerina. But going en pointe is not good for growing feet, and her ballet teacher says her feet aren’t ready yet. Oh, yes, they are,” Tallulah thinks. And so am I.” Not only is she ready, but she is also determined. And nothing stops Tallulah when her mind is made up!

When Tallulah sees the Lilac Fairy throw away her toe shoes, Tallulah sneaks them out of the trash. Once she’s home, she tries to stand on pointe, but she “didn’t look much like the Lilac Fairy. She looked more like a rat.” Tallulah asks her brother, Beckett, to help her by pretending to be a prince. With Beckett’s help, Tallulah is able to stand on pointe, but afterwards her toes are “hot and red.” Tallulah doesn’t think she will able to be able to dance on pointe, but with a little encouragement from the Lilac Fairy, Tallulah realizes that even though she can’t dance on pointe today, someday she will get her own toe shoes and will be able to dance on pointe.

Tallulah’s Toe Shoes highlights Tallulah’s desire to be able to dance on pointe like the older ballet students. Throughout the story, Tallulah uses her imagination, which comes to life as part of the illustrations. In this installment of the Tallulah Series, Beckett plays a larger role which adds cuteness to the story and shows that boys can also love ballet. Another positive aspect of the illustrations is that the other students in Tallulah’s ballet class have different skin tones and the class includes a boy. 

Tallulah’s Toe Shoes will appeal to readers who are interested in dance; in class, Tallulah learns different types of positions that are illustrated in the front and back of the book. In order to help readers distinguish the narration from Tallulah’s thoughts, her thoughts are written in large, bold letters. Since each page has two to seven sentences, parents will need to read the picture book to their kids.

The Tallulah picture book series is a wonderful series that will appeal to many young readers, especially those who dream of becoming a ballerina. Tallulah is a likable protagonist with a relatable conflict, and even though Tallulah doesn’t get her pointe shoes, she learns the importance of patience and hard work. Tallulah’s dance dilemma comes to life in beautiful illustrations that show Tallulah’s wide range of emotions. The illustrations show several scenes of dancers performing Sleeping Beauty, which adds a fairytale quality to the book. Tallulah’s Toe Shoes will delight young readers and have them imagining themselves as beautiful ballerinas. 

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language   

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

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Bulldozer Helps Out

The construction site bustled.
Cement Truck was stirring . . . stirring . . . stirring.
Digger Truck was scooping . . . scooping . . . scooping.
Crane Truck was lifting . . . lifting . . . lifting. 

It’s a busy day at the construction site! Everyone is stirring, scooping, and lifting, and Bulldozer is . . . watching. Bulldozer wants to help, but can he handle a rough, tough job for a rough, tough truck? When Bulldozer gets his chance, the whole team is in for a big surprise.  

Readers will instantly connect with Bulldozer, who just wants to help. However, when Bulldozer offers to help, he gets a variety of answers: “You’ll get hurt,” or, “You’re too little.” Finally, the other trucks give Bulldozer a job. However, at the end of the day when the trucks go to check on Bulldozer, they discover that “he hadn’t done a single thing they’d asked!” The surprise ending will delight young readers and show that Bulldozer is up for a “rough, tough job!” 

Bulldozer Helps Out uses simple illustrations and bold colors that will captivate readers by making Bulldozer and the other trucks seem like friends. Each page has a full-page illustration and three to nine sentences. Despite this, readers will not become bored by the story because many of the sentences use fun elements such as alliteration, dialogue, and truck sounds.  

Bulldozer Helps Out shows readers that sometimes being rough and tough means being caring. The fun story will have wide appeal because Bulldozer is a relatable character with a conflict that young children will empathize with. For more truck-related books, rumble to the library and pick up a copy of Go, Go, Trucks! by Jennifer Liberts 

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural 

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Spiritual Content 

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I (Don’t) Like Snakes

Some families have dogs, some have cats. Some have both. What’s less often heard of is a family with not just one, but several pet snakes! Unfortunately for one girl, this family is her family. While she states that she “really, really, REALLY doesn’t like snakes,” her family doesn’t see what’s not to love. They let their pet snakes rest on their shoulders. The snakes sit beside them on the couch while they watch TV. Their house is covered wall to wall in pictures of their many pet snakes. So, when they learn that a member of their own family can’t stand snakes, they can only ask, “Why?” 

For the girl, there are many reasons she doesn’t like snakes. They slither. They’re slimy. Their eyes are creepy, and their sharp, flickering tongues are just as off-putting! With each reason the girl gives, her family shows the reasons people fear snakes come from simple misconceptions. For example, their “slimy, icky skin” is actually dry. It only looks wet because its outer skin is see-through and naturally shiny. Each fact that the family gives is followed by a page that expands their point in greater detail. 

In these pages, the book’s charming, pencil-drawn illustrations are exchanged for more detailed, photorealistic drawings of snakes, complete with several individual facts about the nature of snakes and their many abilities. One diagram shows that the tail of a rattlesnake is actually leftover skin that creates a rattling sound that frightens predators. As any of the many people scared of snakes would tell you, this trick works! 

Written by zoologist and author Nicola Davies, I (Don’t) Like Snakes is a quick and simple book that is almost guaranteed to ease some of the many snake-related fears held by younger and older readers alike. Luciano Lozano draws the illustrations in a cute and colorful style. Plus, readers will relate to the funny protagonist who narrates. The book manages to be entertaining and educational. While most of I (Don’t) Like Snakes is occupied with informing the reader about the many traits of snakes, Lozano humors the detail-oriented reader with plenty of laughable background gags – a snake reading over the shoulder of the girl’s big brother might be the best one. 

Even though I (Don’t) Like Snakes is intended for younger readers, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. The book features about 1-9 sentences per page. Some pages include fun facts about snakes written in a smaller font. As part of the Read and Wonder Series, I (Don’t) Like Snakes introduces readers to natural history and fascinating facts that show how wonderful the natural world is. If you are looking for a book that will make you laugh while teaching you and your young reader a few things too, I (Don’t) Like Snakes will make for an excellent read. For another educational and humorous book that teaches about animals, slither to the bookshelf and find What If You Had Animal Teeth!? by Sandra Markle.  

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Supernatural 

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Spiritual Content 

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Eyes that Speak to the Stars

A young boy comes to recognize his own power and ability to change the future. When a friend at school creates a hurtful drawing, the boy turns to his family for comfort. He realizes that his eyes have the power to rise to the skies and speak to the stars, shine like sunlit rays, and glimpse trails of light from those who came before. In fact, his eyes are like his father’s, his agong’s, and his little brother’s they are visionary.

Inspired by the men in his family, the young boy recognizes his own power and strength from within. This extraordinary picture book redefines what it means to be truly you. The story celebrates the relationships between fathers and sons by showing the wonderful and loving relationship through three generations of men. Throughout the story, the boy comes to understand the beauty of his eyes—they are just like his family members’ eyes. 

The beautiful illustrations have elements that highlight how each member of the family looks similar. The pictures also have elements of the family’s culture in them such as dragon kites, the deity Mazu, and a café in Japan. However, when the boy begins to understand the power of his eyes, the illustrations feature fanciful celestial illustrations that reinforce the boy’s sense of power. As the boy stands on a planet, a starlight dragon behind him, the boy thinks, “I am the emperor of my own destiny. I read a bright future in the stars and will fight to make it reality.” 

While Eyes that Speak to the Stars celebrates an Asian boy, anyone who has been teased because of their physical appearance will feel empowered by the picture book. Even though Eyes that Speak to the Stars is a picture book, the figurative language may be difficult for young readers to understand. Therefore the story will need to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it themselves. If you’d like to introduce more stories that focus on self-love, check out I Am Enough by Grace Byers, Not Quite Snow White by Ashley Franklin, and Sulwe by Lupita Nyong’O.

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

  • The story mentions Mazu, the Goddess of the Sea, who is a deity popularly worshiped in various parts of Southeast Asia. Through Agong’s eyes, the boy sees “Mazu’s miracles showing mercy from on high.” 

My Diwali Light

Devi loves the Diwali season. It’s a time to wear her favorite red dindi and eat samosas until she bursts! Make mithai and design rangoli with her papa. And paint diyas with her nani—a reminder to shine her light brightly all year long.

The story, with vibrant collage illustrations, follows one girl’s Diwali traditions as her family celebrates their favorite holiday with the ones they love. The illustrations are full of interesting details that feature Devi’s clothing, her family, and her neighborhood. The pictures’ brilliant, bright colors give the book a joyous, festive tone. Each page has one to five sentences. However, both the complex sentence structure and the frequent use of Hindi words will require the book to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. Since the book doesn’t contain a glossary, My Diwali Light will not help children from other cultures to understand the customs associated with Diwali. 

Devi’s activities show a strong sense of family and the importance of learning from your elders. For example, “Nani says when we clean our home, we remember to keep our hearts clean, too.” During the holiday preparations, Devi’s family strings marigolds and twinkling lights and also paints diyas. While they are preparing for the holiday, Nani says “the flame is a reminder for all of us to shine our lights brightly, to be kind, helpful, and loving.” 

While readers unfamiliar with the holiday may have difficulty understanding some of the book’s language, the general concept of allowing your kindness to shine will be understood by all readers. My Diwali Light revolves around Devi’s family, who show kindness to each other as well as others. 

While all of Devi’s family celebrates the season, they all celebrate differently, which allows readers to understand that the holiday is about sharing the Diwali light and sparkle. 

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language   

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

  • As part of the holiday tradition, Devi’s Papa gets the thali ready and Devi “sprinkle[s] the rice and the water and help[s] shower the statures in the mandir with milk, yogurt, honey, ghee, and sugar. We offer flowers and mithai. I shake the coins. Mama sings the aarti, and I ring my bell loudly.”
  • Devi’s family prays “our own prayers, quietly whispering words of hope from deep in our hearts.” The family prays for health, happiness, peace, and that “we are always together on Diwali.” 

Bunny’s Book Club

Bunny loves to sit outside the library with the kids and listen to summer story time. But when the weather gets cold and everyone moves inside, his daily dose of joy is gone. Desperate, Bunny refuses to miss out on any more reading time and devises a plan to sneak into the library at night . . . through the library’s book drop! 

Soon, Bunny hatches a plan for a great adventure—one that brings the joy of reading to all his forest friends. 

Bunny’s Book Club will introduce children to the magic of reading as they learn about Bunny and his forest friends, who love reading books and who have a wide range of interests. Bunny loves sharks and swashbucklers, while porcupine is interested in caterpillars and cocoons. Mouse wants to read about ghosts, and Mole wants to learn about volcanoes. Young readers will fall in love with Bunny and his friend who find delight in curling up with a good book. Readers’ hearts will speed up when the librarian shows up and catches the inquisitive creatures. The book ends with a sweet conclusion that will leave readers smiling. 

Bunny’s Book Club is a delightful story with an engaging plot and adorably cute pictures that add to the book’s charm. The large, full-colored illustrations are whimsical and each animal shows their love of books in a unique way. Bunny sneaks a stack of “his treasures through the book slot.” Porcupine hugs a book about hedgehogs. Throughout the story, one thing is clear: Books are full of wonder and the library is full of adventure.  

Even though Bunny’s Book Club is a picture book, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. Each page has two to eight sentences that include a lot of dialogue. The story is full of onomatopoeias, alliteration, and dialogue which makes Bunny’s Book Club perfect for reading aloud.  

 Bring the magic of reading into a child’s life by introducing them to Bunny and his woodland friends. Readers will be so captivated by both the story and the illustrations that they will want to read Bunny’s Book Club again and again. The story gives many examples of how a book can take readers on wonderful adventures, so be prepared for a trip to the library. Since Bunny often has cupcakes and tea while reading, Bunny’s Book Club is best served with a sweet treat. Young readers can go on another adventure with a bunny by reading Charlotte the Scientist Finds a Cure by Camille Andros and Too Many Carrots by Katy Hudson. 

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural 

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Spiritual Content 

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Honeysmoke: A Story of Finding Your Color

Simone, a young biracial girl looks around her world for her color. She asks her parents and her classmates, “What color am I?” All of them have a different answer. The girl compares herself to different colors—the black of a tire, the color of chocolate, and finally her coloring pencils. By studying her parents, she finally chooses her own color, and creates a new word for herself―honeysmoke. 

Honeysmoke shows one young girl’s struggle to understand herself. Because she doesn’t look like the other kids at school, she tries to find the right word to describe her skin color. “Simone wants a color, one that shows who she is on the inside and the outside.” In the end, Simone realizes that she is a mix of both her mother and her father and she comes up with a word — honeysmoke — that reflects both of them. The last page of the story reads, “Colors are words. Words are colors. Discover your color word.” The page shows different colors and describes them with creative names such as bronze leaf, copper storm, sugar coal, etc.  

While many readers may not relate to Simone’s conflict, they will recognize the need to understand who they are and how they fit into this world. Honeysmoke encourages readers to embrace each person’s differences including their own. The story would be the perfect conversation starter about heredity as well as loving yourself. 

The illustrations have beautiful and vibrant colors that jump off the page. The students at Simone’s school are diverse and show how each student is unique. In addition, Simone’s skin tone is contrasted with everyday objects that young readers will be familiar with such as glue, teddy bears, and colored pencils. Each page has one to six sentences that use simple vocabulary that makes the message shine. 

Honeysmoke is a beautiful story that highlights the importance of accepting yourself. In addition, the story shows the importance of words and encourages readers to creatively play with words. Adults who are looking for a picture book with a positive message will find Honeysmoke an excellent addition to their library. If you’re looking for another picture book that encourages readers to love their differences, add Angus All Aglow by Heather Smith, Danbi Leads the School Parade by Anna Kim, and I Am Enough by Grace Byers to your reading list. 

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural 

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Spiritual Content 

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Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer

Mary Golda Ross designed classified airplanes and spacecrafts as Lockheed Aircraft Corporation’s first female engineer. Find out how her passion for math and the Cherokee values she was raised with shaped her life and work.

Cherokee author Traci Sorell and Métis illustrator Natasha Donovan trace Ross’s journey from being the only girl in a high school math class to becoming a teacher to pursuing an engineering degree, joining the top-secret Skunk Works division of Lockheed, and being a mentor for Native Americans and young women interested in engineering. 

Mary Golda Ross’s amazing life will encourage readers of all ages to pursue their passions by working hard. When Mary attended a state teacher’s college, the boys refused to work with her which motivated Mary to “get better grades than they did.” In her early career, Mary shared her love of math as a teacher. However, when World War II started, Mary went to work at the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, where she helped design fast-flying planes. Later, she worked on spacecrafts that “helped the Apollo space program send astronauts to the moon!” Even though Mary never received public acclaim, that didn’t bother her. Throughout her life, Mary continued to work hard and encourage young women to study math and science.

As the first female engineer for Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, Mary “modeled the Cherokee value of working together in mind and heart.” Mary also wasn’t afraid to ask questions. Even though Mary was the only female, she proved herself a capable engineer. “Her male colleagues respected her intellect, her drive to solve problems, and how she worked in the team.” These qualities allowed Mary to make a positive impact in the world. 

Mary’s experiences come to life in realistic illustrations that use muted colors. One of the best aspects of the illustrations is their ability to incorporate math and science. For example, one picture shows a series of images of teenage Mary using a microscope, helping with a science experiment, and performing another task; around these pictures are math equations. Pictures of planes and drafting pages are incorporated into many of the illustrations.

Even though The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer is a picture book, the story is intended to be read aloud to a child, rather than for the child to read it for the first time independently. Each page has one to four complex sentences that will be difficult for beginning readers to tackle on their own. In addition, the book contains some advanced vocabulary such as colleagues, orbiting satellites, concepts, and classified. Even though some readers will not understand all the book’s concepts during the first read, The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross is still an excellent book to share with young readers.

The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer is an American Indian Library Association Youth Literature Award Honor Picture Book; this award to given to stories that represent Indigenous North American peoples in the fullness of their humanity. This picture book is a must-read not only because it introduces a woman of importance, but also because “the narrative highlights Cherokee values including education, working cooperatively, remaining humble, and helping ensure equal opportunity and education for all.” To learn more about women who made notable contributions in engineering, read Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13 by Helaine Becker and Mae Among The Stars by Roda Ahmed.

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

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What If You Had Animal Hair!?

If you could have any animal’s hair, whose would you choose? If you chose a polar bear’s double coat, you would never have to wear a hat when playing in the snow. If you had a reindeer’s hair, it would help you stay afloat in water. And if you had a porcupine’s hair, no bully would ever bother you again! The animal kingdom has lots of awesome types of hair, but yours is pretty great, too!

If you love animals and want to learn more about their hair, then you must read What If You Had Animal Hair!? The simple, entertaining format uses a two-page spread that features a photographic image of the animal and its hair on the left and an illustration of a child with that animal’s hair on the right. The large pictures of children with animal hair are so humorous they will cause giggles.

While What If You Had Animal Hair!? is intended for younger readers, it will appeal to older readers because of the interesting facts and fun illustrations. Each two-page spread has seven to eight complex sentences that beginning readers will need an adult to read aloud to them. Despite this, the story is a quick read that is informative as well as entertaining. Readers will not only learn about familiar animals such as a lion and a zebra but also less familiar animals such as a pangolin and a star-nosed mole.

Introduce a child to non-fiction text by reading What If You Had Animal Hair!? The fun format, silly photos, and engaging text will entertain as it teaches children about animal hair. For more fun facts, fly over to the library and grab a copy of 13 Ways to Eat a Fly by Sue Heavenrich.

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

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Palace of Books

From prolific author, Patricia Polacco, comes a retelling of her first experience with books. Polacco was not always a reader. Growing up, she preferred to spend time on her farm with her grandfather, admiring the birds and absorbing her grandfather’s knowledge of each bird’s species.

When her family moved to California, Polacco had to adjust to life beyond the farm. Fortunately for her, her new teacher, Miss Bice, regularly took her class on nature hikes. One these hikes, Polacco would admire the birds and try to share her knowledge with her classmates. However, her classmates did not share her passion, and they were not interested in the many owl pellets Polacco found on the forest floor. 

To make matters worse, Polacco’s new classroom rewarded reading, something that had always been challenging for her. Although she would eventually come to realize that she had dyslexia, Polacco spent much of her childhood unable to explain her struggle with reading. All she knew was that books were difficult to approach. This perspective changed when Polacco stumbled upon the giant library of her new town. Here, she was greeted by the excited librarian, Mrs. Creavy, who showed her that not all books require words. In fact, this library possessed rare art collections from John James Audubon, an artist renowned for his beautiful paintings of birds. These books introduced Polacco to the wonderful world of illustration and encouraged her own drawings of birds. Though she did not know it, this discovery was the first step in her success as a student and artist.

Palace of Books is a touching and heartfelt true story that will show young readers that everything has an outlet to express themselves, so long as they look for it. The story of art’s power is assisted by beautiful illustrations that fill entire pages. Detailed and lively, these illustrations show how far Polacco has come as an illustrator. It is worth noting that the book’s narration is particularly wordy, with some pages featuring up to 36 sentences of text. This can be a welcome and rewarding challenge to advanced readers, but younger readers may need help navigating the long narration. If you are looking for another story that teaches the importance of individuality and creativity, Palace of Books is the book for you.

Sexual Content 

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Violence 

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Drugs and Alcohol 

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Language 

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Supernatural

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Spiritual Content 

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